Site-specific stop words in Google: what they tell us about the indexation quality

This is the 4th article in the Googleometry Project Series.

Saturation is usually defined as the number of indexed pages in a website. However, supplemental results can be a significant part of the indexed pages, with no ranking value whatsoever. So, a deeper analysis of saturation and indexed pages is needed.

We define 3 kinds of poorly indexed pages:

– Foreign Pages: pages not assigned to any known language, so it show only if the searcher uses “all the Web” in the Language Preferences.

– Pages non associated to keywords: the only appear in the listings when you request site:domain.com, but they have no keywords associated with them. So, they are useless.

– Pages in the Reduced Indexation Set. Those pages are shown when a Stop Word appears in the search query. This indexation is probably limited to the page Title alone.
We researched the effect of combined searches such as:

site:domain.com keyword1 OR keyword2

Experiments were performed along several days, but data sets need to be obtained in the same day, because there is some day-to-day variation.

We found these consistent indicators of website indexation quality:

– number of pages within English filtered pages, versus pages for all the Web. This setting is modified in the Preferences section of Google. Google not only supplies English pages, but also quality-filtered pages. Most pages in any Web search are discarded in the English-only search, although they are in perfect English. These works equally for Spanish or French pages.

For some reason, the English searches tend to place the Supplemental results inside a link, the well known: “In order to show you the most relevant results, we have omitted some entries….”, while the Web searches directly add the Supplementals at the end of the regular organic results. 

Stop Words are specific for each site.

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